Pecha Kucha Adventures

Yesterday, I was privileged (and somewhat petrified) to present what I believe to be the first Pecha Kucha session at an Australian Moodlemoot.

For those unfamiliar with the format, Pecha Kucha requires a presenter to do 20 slides in 20 seconds/slide, for a total of 6 mins and 40 seconds (you can find more over here: http://www.pechakucha.org/faq ).

While a tad challenging as a presenter, the format got a lot of positive feedback, including Martin Dougimas (@moodler) suggesting it be added more permanently to the newly revised Aussie Moots format.

My initial response was not overwhelmingly positive… (NOOOOOOOOO!!)

But on reflection…

The audience got a HUGE amount out of this format. Rapid fire of ideas, sampling in a stream, with many tweeting and commenting that they’d love to follow up more with individual presenters.

So here’s an idea:

What if, next moot, EVERY presenter did a Pecha Kucha of their abstracts? These could be shared in the lead-up to the moot, so that attendees could get a better sense of what each session is about…

There’s a couple of benefits here. As a presenter, I am challenged getting myself ready for the moot, and last minute changes detract from my conference experience. Being REQUIRED to have a Pecha Kucha done before the conference would mean I’m better prepared. As an attendee, I’d have a better opportunity to see what’s in the sessions, and plan out accordingly.

So if this is such a great idea, why was my first reaction “NOOOOOOO!!!!”?

It takes me between 4 and 8 hours to write up a 15 minute presentation. This involves sourcing images, researching any points I need to clarify, taking screenshots of any tricky steps, and ensuring the message is clear and coherent.

It takes me between 6 and 12 hours to write up an 1 hour long presentation.

So it *should* take me between 2 and 6 hours to write a 6 minute presentation right?

Wrong.

It took me 20+ hours.

20+ hours!

Design is not a matter of what you add – its what you take away. How simple can you make it and still retain your message?

That takes time. Honing and polishing.

I’m not sure how presenters would respond to that. But I would very much like to encourage them to give it a go.

Want to share your thoughts? Comment below or tweet me @moodlechick

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